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Saturday, September 5

  1. user_add smith210 smith210 joined OU-UHR
    6:04 am

Friday, September 4

  1. page home edited ... {reportphishing.png} Next: Examples of Phishing Emails If you would like to contribute to …
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    {reportphishing.png}
    Next: Examples of Phishing Emails
    If you would like to contribute to this wiki, please contact Dana Pierce at dpierce@oakland.edu
    (view changes)
    1:11 pm

Monday, February 23

  1. page home edited ... Both of these examples demonstrate a computer scam known as "phishing" (pronounced &…
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    Both of these examples demonstrate a computer scam known as "phishing" (pronounced "fishing"). Basically, the crooks are fishing for information about you that you wouldn't normally give them, and they get more and more effective in tricking you.
    Still confused? Watch the following video:
    ...
    the video. If you don't see a "Report phishing" option, or it says "Report not phishing," then Google has already identified this as a phishing scam and you can simply click "Report spam."
    {reportphishing.png}
    Next: Examples of Phishing Emails
    (view changes)
    7:11 am

Thursday, March 20

  1. page Examples of Phishing Emails edited ... Sender email link is obviously not Wells Fargo <noreply @ googlesiram .com> Most import…
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    Sender email link is obviously not Wells Fargo <noreply @ googlesiram .com>
    Most important: any time an email threatens to block or deactivate your account if you don't log in, IT'S A SCAM
    Example 3.4. Hey buddy!
    {heydana.png}
    The personalization on these emails is what throws people off. Both of these mails mention my name, and appear at first glance to be from people in my contacts list. The second one, J. Robinson, is my uncle. However, there are a few REALLY BIG clues that this is a scam.
    (view changes)
    6:05 am
  2. page Examples of Phishing Emails edited Here are some examples of actual phishing emails received at Oakland University. These first examp…
    Here are some examples of actual phishing emails received at Oakland University.
    These first examples are trying to get you to give the criminals your log in information so that they can steal your identity, and, most likely, your money.
    Example 1. NEW! Credit monitoring alert
    Criminals will take advantage of timing. During tax season, OU employees received this alert, which is actually warning you about people trying to steal your identity. Clever. There are several clues, though, that tell you it isn't legitimate:
    {Phishing email.png}
    The comments in red are from OUPD. I also want to point out the very casual tone, the use of the ampersand symbol (&), the poor grammar, capitalization and punctuation.
    Example 2.
    Email log-in
    From: Oakland University <mail_servicetnc@yahoo.com>
    Date: April 21, 2013, 4:51:23 PM EDT
    ...
    Body link is obviously not Oakland either <http://klcves.php5.cz/>
    Most important: any time an email threatens to block or deactivate your account if you don't log in, IT'S A SCAM
    Example 2.3. Wells Fargo
    {wellsfargo.png}
    Now it was easy to know this was a scam, because I do not do business with Wells Fargo. But 70 million people are customers of Wells Fargo, so it's a pretty good bet that someone who sees this would think it was legitimate.
    (view changes)
    6:04 am

Thursday, August 29

  1. page home edited ... {reportphishing.png} Next: Examples of Phishing Emails If you would like to contribute to …
    ...
    {reportphishing.png}
    Next: Examples of Phishing Emails
    If you would like to contribute to this wiki, please contact Dana Pierce at dpierce@oakland.edu
    (view changes)
    5:57 am

Tuesday, August 13

  1. page home edited {protectyOUrself.png} Oakland Oakland University Security ... on your computer. computer a…
    {protectyOUrself.png}
    Oakland
    Oakland University Security
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    on your computer.computer and on your personally identifiable information.
    In the "real world," someone could steal your pocketbook and use your credit cards and/or identification to make purchases or cause all sorts of other trouble for you. This is known as "identity theft." But did you know that you are also subject to a similar form of identity theft in the virtual world online?
    Cyber criminals exist with one purpose: trick you into giving them access to your personal information. They can do this in several ways:
    (view changes)
    5:28 am

Wednesday, August 7

  1. page Examples of Phishing Emails edited ... A short, generic opening and an unfamiliar link No signature. Nicole would have definitely sa…
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    A short, generic opening and an unfamiliar link
    No signature. Nicole would have definitely said something like, "Love ya! Nik" and my uncle would've signed his "Uncle Jack."
    SoNext: So what do you know?

    (view changes)
    8:30 am

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